7 Trees You Should Never Plant In Your Yard

Most homeowners know the value of curb appeal, and want their properties to be aesthetically pleasing on the outside, as well as the interior. Because of this, we frequently plant all kinds of organisms, from flowers and shrubs, to grass and vegetables throughout our lawn. The chances are, if you’re passionate about exercising your green thumb, you’ll eventually decide to plant a tree or two of your own as a way to maximize the visual appeal of your home, and access great summer shade. Unfortunately, there are a few trees that you will need to avoid for a variety of reasons – from weather dangers, to damaging your foundation, pests, and even making allergies worse. Here are just some of the trees that you should never plant in your yard.

7 trees you should never plant

1. Cottonwood Trees

Plenty of tree lovers enjoy the appeal of the cottonwood tree – particularly because of its charming appearance and low need for maintenance. Unfortunately, the cottonwood tree encompasses a soft and shallow root system, which makes it prone to instances of rotting, and can mean it becomes unstable throughout periods of bad weather and severe storms. Besides the fact that the wood itself is highly brittle, it’s worth noting that diseases and insects frequently damage it too, creating all the more risk that it will end up on your roof, car, or garage after a rough storm.

2. Mulberry Tree

Though some trees, such as the cottonwood, struggle with a weak root system and soft wood, the Mulberry tree is dangerous for a radically different reason. Most people should avoid planting this tree in their yard simply because it produces huge amounts of pollen, which attracts insects and pests. Though it can offer some great summer shade, it’s not worth the extra creepy-crawlies that will infest your home.

3. White Pine

Though the white pine doesn’t typically reach extensive heights – like many other trees, an issue arises in the fact that this tree is particularly sensitive, and requires a lot of maintenance. In colder climates, the white pine often suffers winter or ice-related damage, and also attracts plenty of pests, ranging from bagworms to sapsuckers.

4. Leyland Cypress

The Leyland Cypress is a tree that grows incredibly fast – meaning that it needs trimming frequently to ensure you don’t end up with branches everywhere. This is another form of tree that can frequently be uprooted during periods of severe wind or stormy weather, even if they are decades old – making them quite dangerous to grow around houses. What’s more, pests like bagworms love to reside in this particular kind of tree.

5. Mimosa Tree

Similarly to the cottonwood tree, the mimosa tree has particularly weak wood that makes it highly unpredictable during storms. What’s more, this type of tree attracts webworm and pests – what’s more, the Mimosa is also famous for producing quickly-germinating seeds. This could mean that you might end up with a huge forest of mimosa trees quicker than you could possibly imagine.

6. Bradford Pear

Plenty of professional gardeners and homeowners alike love the aesthetic appeal of the Bradford pear tree, as it’s durable, beautiful, and requires very little in the way of long term maintenance. Unfortunately, the naturally pyramidal shape of the tree serves to make it particularly fragile. The way that the branches grow ensure that ice, snow, and high winds are not its friend, as the branches cannot take the weight and the limbs will quickly start to split. If that’s not enough, the flowering blooms also have a particularly unpleasant smell.

7. Quaking Aspen

Found often in northern climates, the quaking aspen has gently vibrating leaves and white bark – making it highly attractive in most yards. Unfortunately, the root system is insidious – sending up numerous suckers that turn relentlessly into brand new trees. In other words, when you plant a quaking aspen, you could be fighting against a forest that’s quickly trying to overtake your home.

Plant Carefully

Too many homeowners fail to regard all of the necessary factors when choosing the right tree – thinking instead about how pretty it might look when combined with the other aspects of their yard. However, some trees have deep strong roots that slowly destroy the foundations of your house, whereas others have brittle branches that could destroy property when caught in the throes of a storm. Which kinds of trees do you prefer to plant in your yard, or do you know of another variety that should stay away from homes entirely? Let us know in the comments!